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Editorial

Ferries Departed

Ender Baskan recalls the enchanting cross-continental journey aboard Istanbul’s nostalgic ferries.

The Year of the Dog

To celebrate the Chinese new year, astrologist Mina Zheng shares her predictions in love, finance and family for the Year of the Dog.

Belgrade’s Kafane: Coffee with Conversation

Sonja Mapleston explores the history and community behind Belgrade’s coffee culture, where the humble short black is central to daily life.

Look at All the Lonely People: Building Urban Communities

Despite having a proclivity for solitude, Marta Skrabacz examines how good urban design can become a catalyst for counteracting loneliness.

Day of the (Living) Dead

Anthropologist Jemimah Widdicombe explores the complexities in New Caledonia’s Fête des Morts, where a relationship with the deceased is an important part of living.

The Light and Dark of Diwali

Amongst the fireworks, street stalls and sparklers, Liz Rowland captures the personal stories and challenges of the annual festival that commemorates the victory of light over darkness, good over evil.

A Feminist Eye on Santiago de Compostela

Imogen Eveson goes in search of the hidden history of women in Spain’s devoted capital of the Camino.

Joan Didion: Living and Writing Between LA and New York City

As a documentary on one of America’s most prolific writers makes its way to the big screen, Heidi Harrington-Johnson reflects on the life of Joan Didion—a woman who lived in, understood, and eloquently wrote about two of America’s most revered cities.

Moving Through Seventy States with Solange Knowles Ferguson

In collaboration with Spanish photographer Carlota Guerrero and director Alan Ferguson, Solange Knowles Ferguson explores black womanhood through a digital dossier of movement, repetition and landscape for the Tate Modern.

Drawing Japan with the Old Man Mad About Drawing

Olivia Dennis reflects on Hokusai’s devotion to Mount Fuji, rural Japanese towns and the daily rituals of those living on the fringes of Japanese society.

How Jews Resisted a Baking Ban; the History of the Bagel

Marta Skrabacz looks back over the story of the bagel: from its 500 years of Polish-Jewish history to its journey from Krakow to Manhattan’s Lower East Side.

The Magic of Mexico City’s Underground Metro

Along with five million other daily commuters, Molly McLaughlin takes a ride on Mexico City’s metro, where creativity and organised chaos shine.

Beci Orpin Discovers a Community of Independent Retailers in Portland

Melbourne maker and artist Beci Orpin shares her favourite local stores in amongst a flourishing independent retail scene in Portland, Oregon.

The Romance of Porto’s Old Accidental Beauty

Olga Kotnowska walks us through the curving alleyways of old Porto, where a tapestry of coloured tiles creates a pathway through a city aged by time, stories and the wash of the Atlantic Ocean.

The Sounds of Tokyo; a City of Records

Anna Snoekstra guides us through the city’s unmarked independent record shops and music megastores in search of those rare finds.

Screaming Through the Silence

Greg Holland discovers Yangon’s punk scene—a movement that arose in rebellion to the political and cultural landscape of Burma’s past.

Where They Lived: the Home of an Artist

From the surrealism that Dalí transposed onto a small Spanish fishing village, to the vibrancy of a Marrakech villa and garden that worked its way into Yves Saint Laurent’s collections, here are five homes that hold a very special place in the heart of their locale and the artist who created them.

MIFF: Films That Take You Places

Lindsay gives you twelve transporting films from this year’s Melbourne International Film Festival (MIFF) program and a step inside the places they’ll take you.

Yarrenyty Arltere Artists Keep Australia’s Heart Beating

Amidst the dry red desert in the centre of Australia, Beth Wilkinson meets a group of Arrernte, Luritja and Walpiri artists who are healing, connecting and sharing stories, one brightly-embroidered soft sculpture at a time.

Our Languages Matter: An Introduction to Boon Wurrung and Woi Wurrung

This NAIDOC week, Bridget Caldwell introduces us to a few words in Boon Wurrung and Woi Wurrung—two of the traditional languages spoken within the Kulin nation, the land on which Lindsay is founded.

Welcome to the Jungle: A View of the Los Angeles Art Scene

Curator Annika Kristensen gives us a drive-by tour of LA’s up-and-coming art scene. Through visits to The Broad, 356 Mission, Chinatown and beyond, Annika attempts to make sense of this city built on clichés; a city once described by Jack Kerouac, and later immortalised by the Guns N’ Roses, as a “jungle.”

Freikörperkultur Lake Swimming

Olivia Dennis shares the infectious freedom that comes from being an unnoticed naked body in one of Berlin’s approximate 80 lakes and recommends her favourite spots to enjoy this local pastime.

Keeping Luxembourgish (Lëtzebuergesch) Living

From its time under French rule to its period occupied by Nazi Germany, Martina Hoffmann looks into the complex history that contributes to the threat of Luxembourgish (Lëtzebuergesch) language, and the strategies in place to keep it alive.

Editorial / Russia

“Pushkinskaya 10 emerged after the Soviet regime crumbled in 1989, to consolidate the non-conformist art culture that had been active below the surface for decades.”

Imogen Eveson, A History of St. Petersburg in Three Art Galleries

A Taste of Spain: How Tapas Took over the World

With an international spread of World Tapas Day events on 15 June, Molly McLaughlin investigates the origins of a concept that, not just the Spanish, but people from all over the world have developed an appetite for.

Six Signature Dishes from the World of Cinema

Max Hayward recalls films where the food plays a leading role. From Tampopo’s artful ramen noodles to Amélie’s freshly torched crème brûlée, these dishes are iconic due to both their cultural significance and their film cameos.

Hair Styles and Leopard Print Cross Geographical Borders

Photographer Émilie Régnier explores the relationship between Africa and the West, celebrity and the everyday person, as she captures women in Côte d’Ivoire beauty salons and people across borders fashioned in leopard print.

Yangon: Conversations About Art

Writer Michelle Aung Thin returns to her birthplace, Myanmar, to find an experimental art scene flourishing in the country’s former capital post the abandonment of nation-wide formal censorship.

A Culinary Intersection Between Aboriginal and Asian Cultures

Eugenia Flynn explains how her culture played out in the kitchen, pantry and on the plate when she was growing up. From Bluchung (a potent condiment consisting of chilli, shrimp paste and aromatics) to Numus (white fish pickled in lemon juice), her stories speak of how food so intimately connects us to our culture, past and home.

Harlem: New York’s Centre for Black Thought and Creativity

For journalist and documentary filmmaker Santilla Chingaipe, the pulse of New York City lies in Harlem: a black mecca home to the legendary Apollo Theater, Studio Museum in Harlem and some of the best African American cuisine on the island.

Editorial / Kiribati

“The canoe is part of who the Kiribati people are—it is their culture, their respect for the ocean and their family member all encompassed into one structure.”

Marita Davies in Te Wa, Kiribati’s Way to the Water

Georgia O’Keeffe’s New Mexico

With exhibitions currently touring worldwide, Imogen Eveson revisits “the tail of the end of the earth,” the landscape that became the muse of one of America’s greatest artists of the 20th century.

The Lost Generation; Cafés in Paris

While Paris continues to be a city where writing and drinking are often deemed inseparable, Lucianne Tonti shares the city’s cafés bestowing literary fame.